2009/6/20 土曜日

Tokyo, Nagoya, Yokohama and Kobe–Three of the most expensive cities in the world

Filed under: English entries,life in Japan,国際家族 — admin @ 21:55:40

According to Yahoo Real Estate, Tokyo is the second most expensive city in the world, following Luanda, Angola. So you might want to consider that when planning your next vacation. Movies are a little bit cheaper in Luanda, but lunch will set you back considerably.

Thanks to overvaluation of the yen in recent years, Tokyo remains a pricey place to live, followed by Nagoya, Yokohama and Kobe in third, fourth, and fifth places.

Tokyo view

Remember the good old days when $1 was 360 yen? Not many people do. Back before the Great Depression, my mother-in-law’s parents immigrated to the US. They farmed in Southern California (Imperial Valley, as far as we can tell), made a little money, moved back to Japan where their funds were worth quite a bit more, and never had to work another day in their lives. (Come to think of it, my mother-in-law and her younger sister were born after their parents had effectively retired.)

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Nowadays, I suppose I could dream of doing the opposite. Close up shop in Japan and move back to California; maybe buy a house that has lost half of its value in the past couple of years. I wonder if the Oakland A’s still have Dollar Wednesdays…

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Definition of “Translation”

Filed under: 学校,翻訳業 — admin @ 9:06:41

Translator and blogger Anne Ishii posted her definition of what translation is all about on her blog “Ill Iterate.”

Her three basic steps of “Tuck” (as in “to tuck in”–I think), “shave,” and finally “dress up,” pretty much describe the process.

I was also delighted to see that she has renamed the profession: I can now proudly call myself a “trannie!”

A couple of weeks ago, I gave my students at GWPU an assignment to  reorganize and rewrite an English press release from a certain publisher, giving them both the Japanese and English versions to work with. Ignoring the fact that only about half the class finished the assignment on time, I was thrilled to see that they produced versions much shorter than the original, with one about a third of the original length.

It was an incredible job of “shaving,” now I’ll have to read it to see if it’s properly “dressed up…”

2009/6/19 金曜日

Review of “How I Saved a Bank”

Filed under: English entries,,翻訳業 — admin @ 17:17:15

The Japan Today website has a wonderful review of How I Saved a Bank with a Little Help from the Cosmos by Tadahiko Ito, and edited by me.

2009/6/9 火曜日

車業界の近況〜なぜ買えないの

Filed under: life in Japan,日本語,翻訳業 — admin @ 19:59:59

生まれて初めて買った「マイカー」がかれこれ7才になろうとしてます。私は年取ってから免許を取ったので、色々な車を乗りたいのです。そろそろ3回目の車検が回ってきたし、車検を機会に車を変え買えようと思って、3月に検討し始めました。しかし、車業界が大パニックということをすっかり忘れてしまいました。その上、3月は決算です。

ちなみに、昔から車が話題になると私の仕事に必ずと言っていいほど影響がでます。日本の車は世界の車ですし、日本の産業と言えば車ですから、車関係の仕事がたくさんあります。どのクライエントでも多少車の翻訳仕事があります。でも、今回は仕事より個人的な影響がでました。

ディーラーに行っては試乗させてもらって、ついでに値段等について色々聞きました。1ヶ月でも2ヶ月でももっとでもゆっくりと調べたかったところ、ディーラーのセールスの皆さんはどうやら今週中に決めてほしいと熱心に働きかけてきます。

そして家に帰った後でも、夕方になるとそれぞれのセールスの方が訪れてきます。電話もなります。連日に訪問者がいて、落ち着かなくなりました。結局、安心して夕飯を食べるために鍵をかけて、雨戸をしめました。ホー。

毎日のストレスにさらなら緊張となりましたので、車を買うことを一時的に止めました。今の車を車検にだして、夏休みの終わり頃にもう一度挑戦しようと決めました。それまでは周りで走っている車を観察して、マイペースな車選びを楽しんでいます。

2009/6/8 月曜日

Short Stories by Nobuko Takagi

Filed under: — admin @ 8:01:19

Nobuko Takagi, author of Translucent Tree, lives and works in Kyushu, doing research on other Asian studies out of Kyushu University. Read about her activities on her website, Soaked in Asia (SIA). The top page is available in both Japanese and English. You’ll also notice a tab that will lead to her “Short Stories.” Takagi writes a story set in each country she visits, and I’ve been privileged to translate the last three. Two are currently posted: vol. 6 “Mongolian Flight” (set in Mongolia), and vol. 5 “Casting Out,” set in Shanghai. Look forward to her latest, “Tomosui,” inspired by her trip to Thailand.

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